February 23, 2014 at 10:21pm
73 notes
Reblogged from deviatesinc

deviatesinc:

Claude Cahun self-portraits, 1929

(via rosswolfe)

February 21, 2014 at 8:47pm
86 notes
Reblogged from violencegirl

violencegirl:

Hell yeah, Pussy Riot bloodied but unbowed in their new protest action: Watch: Putin Will Teach You To Love The Motherland

February 20, 2014 at 1:13pm
0 notes
50 Watts:

Vera Idelson’s costume and set design illustrations for the Italian Futurist play The Anguish of the Machines (La mascherata degli impotenti, 1923) by Ruggero VasariFrom the January 1925 issue of Der Sturm (Berlin)

50 Watts:

Vera Idelson’s costume and set design illustrations for the Italian Futurist play The Anguish of the Machines (La mascherata degli impotenti, 1923) by Ruggero Vasari

From the January 1925 issue of Der Sturm (Berlin)

February 19, 2014 at 3:06pm
0 notes

But Google’s 360 programme, which photographs indoors, has no pretence of cartography. The people are now the point in spite of their blurred faces. Human behaviours and interactions are recorded in these images of restaurants, libraries, hair salons and dentist waiting rooms. Even if a business decides to vacate when the photographer arrives, there is no mistaking the lingering traces of humanity. Taste and personality come across in the tattered lace of a cafe tablecloth or a vase of flowers on an empty reception desk at a car dealership.

— Joanne McNeil, “Look Inside: The unexpected uses of Google Street View” in Frieze Magazine

9:58am
1 note
Reblogged from aaroncarpenter

aaroncarpenter:

Una Passiegata - A Picaresque in Google Street View Postcards, 2008 - ongoing. Complete archive viewable here.

Nice explanation of what the hell this is by Sarah Todd here.

February 17, 2014 at 3:04pm
0 notes

I was never one of those critics or theorists who felt there is a literary “system.” If there is one, it is a very inefficient one for sure, designed by its very nature for failure, for in these and other texts we can find the straining of the very notion of systems. This stress factor, I argue, can be interpreted as the imprint of doubt, skepticism, critique, resistance, some of which is successful in challenging the system, some not. They all try to move the center. These texts gesture toward visions and aspirations to be other than systemic, or let’s say they point to a relation of tension between themselves and any binding systemic account of itself. They point to the strengths and weaknesses of the systems in which they are positioned.

— David Palumbo-Liu, “If Comparative Literature is a Global Positioning System, How Can We Move the Center?”

February 14, 2014 at 3:00am
12 notes
Reblogged from aaroncarpenter
towerofsleep:

aaroncarpenter:

Finnigin Swake, Entire text of Joyce novel rendered into Star Wars crawl, DVD, Duration: 478 hours. 2010. 

I remember seeing this in person and having no idea wtf it was. I liked it, though.

towerofsleep:

aaroncarpenter:

Finnigin Swake, Entire text of Joyce novel rendered into Star Wars crawl, DVD, Duration: 478 hours. 2010. 

I remember seeing this in person and having no idea wtf it was. I liked it, though.

February 6, 2014 at 3:39am
9 notes
Reblogged from antirecognition
antirecognition:

Photos by Emily Raw emilyraw.com

via prostheticknowledge

antirecognition:

Photos by Emily Raw emilyraw.com

via prostheticknowledge

February 4, 2014 at 5:05am
22 notes
Reblogged from rhizomedotorg

rhizomedotorg:

Land Art of the Anthropocene

image

every room has an accessible history
every place has emotional attachments you can open and save
you can search for sadness in new york

paths compete to offer themselves to you
life flows into inanimate objects
the trees hum advertising jingles
everything in the world, animate and inanimate, abstract and concrete, has thoughts attached

— from Headmap Manifesto by Ben Russell

January 27, 2014 at 1:46pm
1 note

Art can offer no obvious return. Its rate of exchange is energy for energy, intensity for intensity. The time you spend on art is the time it spends with you; there are no shortcuts, no crash courses, no fast tracks. Only the experience. Art can’t change your life; it is not a diet programme or the latest guru - it offers no quick fixes. What art can do is prompt in us authentic desire. By that I mean it can waken us to truths about ourselves and our lives; truths that normally lie suffocated under the pressure of the 24-hour emergency zone called real life. Art can bring us back to consciousness, sometimes quietly, sometimes dramatically, but the responsibility to act on what we find is ours.

— Jeanette Winterson, “The secret life of us” (via @charlottefrost)